Author Archives: Wendy Parker

Midweek books: A sports-related book on the banned list

TweetFour parents are what I have altogether, not unlike a whole lot of other kids. But quite unlike a whole lot of other kids, there ain’t a hetero among ‘em. My dad’s divorced and remarried, and my mom’s divorced and remarried, so my mathematical account of my family suggests simply another confused teenager from a [...]

Sports History Files: A continuing hold on Mayo’s anguish

TweetWhile American football fans were awakening to seemingly endless hours of NFL pregame shows Sunday morning, there were a few souls in their midst gathering mainly in Irish pubs to watch the finals of another football code on other shores.
And to see if a long-lamented club could end more than 60 years of agony.
In the [...]

Sports History Files: Billie Jean King in the arena, Part 3

TweetThis week I’m devoting this blog to a three-part retrospective on Billie Jean King, who defeated Bobby Riggs in “The Battle of the Sexes” on Sept. 20, 1973. I’m particularly interested in her enduring public persona and how she embodies an ideal that has eluded other women’s sports leaders. Here’s Part 1 from Monday and [...]

Sports History Files: Billie Jean King in the arena, Part 2

TweetThis week I’m devoting this blog to a three-part retrospective on Billie Jean King, who defeated Bobby Riggs in “The Battle of the Sexes” on Sept. 20, 1973. I’m particularly interested in her enduring public persona and how she embodies an ideal that has eluded other women’s sports leaders. Here’s Part 1 from Monday; the [...]

Sports History Files: Billie Jean King in the arena, Part 1

TweetThis week I’m devoting this blog to a three-part retrospective on Billie Jean King, who defeated Bobby Riggs in “The Battle of the Sexes” on Sept. 20, 1973. I’m particularly interested in her enduring public persona and how she embodies an ideal that has eluded other women’s sports leaders. Other posts in this series will [...]

Sports History Files: Women and long-distance swimming

TweetIt didn’t take long for some eyebrows to be raised over Diana Nyad’s record swim from Cuba to Key West earlier this month. On Sunday, The New York Times took a deeper look, and I’ll leave it to the parties interviewed to shed some light on what probably will always be a murky tale.
Nyad vehemently [...]

Weekend arts and culture: A sports art competition

TweetA new exhibit has opened in Florida featuring the finalists of the National Art Museum of Sport’s 3rd annual Commitment to Excellence in Art and Sport.
Last night a reception was held in Bradenton to kick off the exhibit, which continues at the ArtCenter Manatee’s Kellogg Center until Sept. 21.
The exhibit, co-sponsored by the National Collegiate Athletic [...]

Midweek books: The essential Ring Lardner collection

TweetLast week the Library of America released its long-awaited “Ring Lardner: Stories & Other Writings,” and I’m hopeful this may spur a revival about a writer who’s been dead for 80 years.
This volume — edited by Ian Frazier, writer, humorist and contributor to The New Yorker — comes in at a whopping 974 pages, and [...]

Labor Day Weekend Special: Late summer sports reads

TweetInstead of my usual Monday Sports History File post, I’m offering up this collection of outstanding stories from the last week or so that dovetail with the sports book/history/culture theme of this blog. I really do appreciate the labor of these writers.
I’ll be back with another Midweek Books post on Wednesday, and it’s about a [...]

Weekend arts and culture: A sports museum’s revival

TweetThe recent odyssey of the Negro Leagues Museum is the subject of this terrific piece in The New York Times last weekend by Nate Taylor, who writes about president Bob Kendrick’s return to the Kansas City institution and its greater state of financial health.
Kendrick left the fold following the 2006 death of the legendary Buck [...]