Tag Archives: Baseball Hall of Fame

Summer Readings: Roger Angell and ‘An Angel or the Devil’

TweetRichard Sandomir writes about Roger Angell of The New Yorker, the J.G. Taylor Spink honoree into the Baseball Hall of Fame for his writing. Now 93, Angell joins the company of Ring Lardner, Red Smith, Shirley Povich and Dick Young.
His baseball essays for the magazine in 1962. He had no previous experience covering the [...]

The Midsummer Classic and the American pastime

TweetJuly is the time for Major League Baseball’s All-Star Game and Hall of Fame induction, so I’ll be devoting some posts this week to topics related to baseball’s future — and as always the case with this sport — and exploring how its past is immortalized.
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I’m [...]

Sports History Files: Baseball’s hidebound gatekeepers

TweetThis time a year ago I wrote about baseball’s dwindling Romantics — those who have Hall of Fame votes but want to deny any player they suspect of steroids use from a having a plaque in Cooperstown — and thought the matter couldn’t get any more bizarre.
But that was last year. The addition next summer [...]

Sports history files: Baseball’s dwindling Romantics

TweetThe burden of history falls upon baseball like perhaps no other sport in North America. The idealism, desire for moral purity and poetic meanderings of some of the game’s most zealous gatekeepers (most of them self-identified, rather than actual) has hardly diminished after more than a century.
This absolutism has at times been a disservice to [...]

Refusing to exercise the Cooperstown franchise

TweetMark Haller of the Arizona Republic claims he’s “choosing to speak loudly by using silence” in declining to fill out a Hall of Fame ballot. But he has plenty more to say about why he’s doing what he’s (not) doing:
“The day of reckoning I’ve been dreading for five years — ever since Barry Bonds [...]

Steroids, moralizing and the Baseball Hall of Fame

TweetMy objections to the War on Steroids are not subtle, nor are they conflicted, as I have written here and here and here.
The caveat has always been that I’m more concerned about the public unaccountability of the taxpayer-funded USADA than athletes who are presumed guilty merely by being charged with doping. Including Lance Armstrong.
But expressing [...]